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Refrigeration and ventilation fans

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15 February 2017
ERF​​
Is the refrigeration and ventilation fans method suitable for your business?
  • Do you use refrigeration fans to service refrigeration systems ​or use ventilation fans to service commercial or industrial buildings or common areas in residential buildings?​
  • Are you looking at installing new fans, or modifying or replacing existing fans to improve the energy efficiency of the fans?
  • If you have answered yes to both of these questions, the refrigeration and ventilation fans method may be suitable for your business. Read on for eligibility and compliance details.

Fans are integral parts of refrigeration and ventilation systems. The refrigeration and ventilation fans method sets out the rules for projects that reduce emissions by improving the efficiency of fans used in certain refrigeration systems including refrigerated display cabinet, freezer cabinet, walk-in cool room and cold storage warehouse and ventilation for commercial or industrial buildings or common areas in residential buildings. By improving efficiency of fans, less electricity is consumed and emissions associated with the generation of electricity are reduced.

The method distinguishes between two different types of activities with different rules for each. These are called high efficiency fan installations and small motor fan upgrades:

  • High efficiency fan installations relate to fans with a motor input power of between 0.125 kilowatts and 185 kilowatts inclusive. For eligible fan types, they must meet or beat the high efficiency grades prescribed in the method. Reduction in energy consumption is estimated using equations that compare the power consumption of the installed high efficiency fan with the power consumption of a fan with a market average level of efficiency. In addition to modifying or replacing existing fans, high efficiency fans can be used in new installations where there are no existing fans as they are measured against a market average grade rather than a previous fan.
  • Small motor fan upgrades relate to the modification or replacement of existing fans or fan motors with a motor input power of up to and including 0.175 kilowatts. The new fans must be driven by an electronically commutated motor and be replacing either a shaded pole or permanent split capacitor motor. Reduction in energy consumption is calculated using a regression equation that quantifies the difference in efficiency between the replaced shaded pole or permanent split capacitor motor of a driven fan and an electronically commutated motor.

Under both activities, the method supports the installation of control devices such as variable speed drives, multi-speed or switching controls to further improve the energy efficiency of fans.

The method is partly based on similar methods used by the New South Wales Energy Savings Scheme (High Efficiency Motors method and Business Appliances method) and the Victorian Energy Efficiency Target scheme (Refrigeration fans activity). However, there are several differences due to overall scheme design and coverage.

Method variations

Section 114 of the Carbon Credits (Carbon Farming Ini​tiative) Act 2011 (the Act)​ ​allows for methods to be revised and varied. This is to ensure methods continue to operate as originally intended. Variations to methods are developed and drafted by the Department of the Environment and Energy. Information on draft methods and method variations is available on the Department of the Environment and Energy’s website.

The Clean Energy Regulator recommends making yourself familiar with proposed method variations relevant to your project should they arise, and how any changes between the original method and the varied method may affect your project plan.

Legislative requirements

You must read and understand the method and other legislative requirements to conduct a refrigeration and ventilation fans project and earn Australian Carbon Credit Units (ACCUs). This includes:

Tools and Resources​

Department of Environment information on the refrigeration and ventilation fans method

Refrigeration and ventilation fans - project application guidance

Quick reference guide to the refrigeration and ventilation fans method

Contents

Crediting period

Seven years – the crediting period is the period of time a project undertakes activities which generate eligible abatement.

Relevant section of the Act:

Eligibility requirements

There are ​general eligibility requirements in the Act which include:

The refrigeration and v​​entilation fans method is then split into two distinct activities (high efficiency fan installations and small motor fan upgrades) and each have additional specific eligibility criteria. Further detail about the specific eligibility criteria for each activity can be found in the Method.

Relevant section of the Act:

Relevant section of the Method:

Exclusions

Section 12 of the Method provides a list of fans that are excluded from the method. Amongst others, these include ventilation fans that are used as part of an industrial process, fans that are used for applications where the operation is infre​quent, such as smoke extraction and pressurisation fans, fans not of an eligible type and fans installed in buildings or refrigeration systems not prescribed in the method.

Relevant section of the Method:

How is abatement calculated?

How abatement is calculated will depend on whether the project involves high efficiency fan installations or small motor fan upgrades.

High efficiency fan installations: abatement is determined by comparing the power consumption of the installed fan with the power consumption of a market average fan of the same fan type and power, with the same installation category.

Small motor fan upgrades: abatement is determined by comparing the difference in fan efficiency between the replaced shaded pole or permanent split capacitor motor of a driven fan and the replacement electronically commutated motor.

Notification requirements

The Method requires project proponents to notify the Clean Energy Regulator of the following:

  • Any safety issues that have been identified with an installed fan or fan component.

If certain conditions are met, any product performance issue that has been identified with an installed fan or fan component.

Relevant section of the Method:

Record keeping requirements

In addition to the general record keeping requirements of the Act and the Rule, Part 5 of the Method sets out the information that must be kept and includes the activities undertaken, the technical specifications and locations of fans, and the building and/or refrigeration system type.

Where applicable, records should also include information on the replaced fans and the appropriate disposal of removed fans.

Relevant section of the Act:

Relevant section of the Rule:

Relevant section of the Method:

Reporting requirements

In addition to the general reporting requirements of the Act and Rule, Part 5 of the Method sets out some method specific requirements for offset reports including:

  • Reports must identify each installed high efficiency and small motor fan including information regarding location, specifications and purpose.
  • Reports must include additional information if fans that were included in previous reports are then excluded from the current report, amongst other things.

Relevant section of the Act:

Relevant section of the Rule:

Relevant section of the Method:

Audits

All projects receive an audit schedule and must provide audit reports according to this schedule. A minimum of three audits will be scheduled and additional audits may be triggered. For more information on the audit requirements, see the Act, the Rule and the audit information on our website.

Relevant section of the Act:

Relevant section of the Rule:

Specialist skills recommended

Specialist skills will be required to carry out the project in accordance with the Method. Examples of specialist skills include:

  • Registered professional engineer (PE)
  • Certified Energy Manager (CEM)
  • Certified Measurement and Verification Professional (CMVP)
  • ​Verified experience in energy or facility management, or measurement and verification

Relevant section of the Rule:

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