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National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting scheme

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​​Context

The National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting scheme was introduced in 2007 as a single national framework for reporting and disseminating company information about greenhouse gas emissions, and energy production and consumption. Corporations that meet legislated thresholds must register and report annually. Reported data informs government policy, programs and activities, avoids duplication of similar reporting requirements in the states and territories, and helps meet Australia’s international reporting obligations.

Data from the scheme was used to determine carbon pricing mechanism liability and is now used to determine baselines for the safeguard mechanism and measure emissions against those baselines. For more details, see Safeguard mechanism. The National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting data is a national asset for its comprehensive coverage of Australia’s energy production, energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions.

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Focus in 2016–17

In 2016–17 we continued to focus on compliance levels by regulated entities and the integrity of reported data.

We also continued to expand the level and type of National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting scheme data shared and publicly released for use by a range of stakeholders.

Highlights in 2016-17

Decorative highlights image  

98% of reports submitted on time

Decorative highlights image  

Corporations reported a total of:

  • 334 million tonnes of scope 1 greenhouse gas emissions
  • 90 million tonnes of scope 2 greenhouse gas emissions
  • 3956 petajoules of net energy consumption
Decorative highlights image  

100% of required data published on time

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Publication of information

Companies report annually on their previous 12 months’ data, which means reports received in 2016–17 provided details for sources of emissions during 2015–16.

We are required by legislation to publish certain information by 28 February each year, including:

  • The National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting scheme data–the total scope 1 and scope 2 greenhouse gas emissions and net energy consumption data reported by registered corporations that exceed the publishing threshold.
  • Data for all facilities with a principal activity of electricity generation–the primary fuel source, emissions intensity and grid connection data for each electricity generator, as well as aggregated emissions and production data reported by the sector. This helps inform the community about the performance of electricity generators and how the sector is tracking in relation to the sectoral baseline set under the safeguard mechanism. For more details see Safeguard mechanism.
  • An extract of the National Greenhouse and Energy Register–names of all controlling corporations13 and reporting transfer certificate holders14 listed on the register during the previous financial year.

As with every year since 2012 we published all required data for 2015–16 on 28 February 2017 on our website.

There were 771 organisations listed on the National Greenhouse and Energy Register in 2016–17.

As well as the legislatively required data publication, we are progressively releasing additional emissions and energy data as part of our continued effort to improve the availability and accessibility of National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting information. For more details see Feature: A closer look at emissions and energy data.

SNAPSHOT

All required emissions and energy data published on time since 2012

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Sources of emissions

Once again, the main source for reported scope 1 greenhouse gas emissions was electricity generation, followed by mining, manufacturing and transport.

Graph 3: Australia’s sources of reported scope 1 emissions by industry for 2015–16
Australia’s sources of reported scope 1 emissions by industry for 2015–16
Graph 3: Australia’s sources of reported scope 1 emissions by industry for 2015–16
Reported scope 1 sourceEmissions by percentage
Mining35.8%
Manufacturing34%
Electricity supply24.9%
Transport, postal and warehousing2.9%
Other2.3%
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Energy production and consumption

In 2015–16 the majority of energy was produced by coal and other solid fossil fuels. Other high energy production fuels included gaseous fossil fuels, uranium, petroleum based products and electricity.

Graph 4: Energy production by fuel type for 2015–16
Energy production by fuel type for 2015–16
Graph 4: Energy production by fuel type for 2015–16
Fuel typeEnergy production by percentage
Coal53%
Gaseous fossil fuels26.6%
Uranium9%
Petroleum based products7.1%
Electricity3.6%
Other0.7%

In 2015–16 the electricity supply industry consumed the most energy in the production of electricity (represented by net energy consumption). Other high net energy consuming industries for this period were manufacturing, mining and transport. The remaining industries collectively represent less than five per cent of net energy consumption.

Graph 5: Net energy consumption 2015–16
Net energy consumption 2015–16
Graph 5: Net energy consumption 2015–16
Energy consuming industryPercentage of enegry consumed
Electricity supply37.5%
Manufacturing29.4%
Mining21.3%
Transport, postal and warehousing6.8%
Other4.9%
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State and territory emissions profile

Companies reported 334 million tonnes of greenhouse gas emissions for 2015–16. Queensland and New South Wales/Australian Capital Territory accounted for the largest percentage of emissions at 26.8 per cent and 26.7 per cent respectively, followed by Victoria at 21.5 per cent and Western Australia at 18.0 per cent.

In all states except the Northern Territory and Tasmania, electricity supply accounted for the greatest proportion of emissions.

Figure 1: State and territory emissions profile 2015–1615
State and territory emissions profile 2015–16
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Use of National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting scheme data

Key uses of scheme data include meeting Australia’s international reporting obligations, informing and assisting with Commonwealth, state and territory policy and program development, and reducing duplication in reporting.

In particular, the National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting scheme data provides a foundation for international reporting work by the Department of the Environment and Energy. For example, scheme data contributes approximately 60 per cent of the emissions data for the National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Report, which is part of the National Greenhouse Accounts produced by the Department of the Environment and Energy. These accounts are required to meet Australia’s reporting commitments under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change.

National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting scheme data also contributes around 80 per cent of the energy data for the Australian Energy Statistics. The Australian Energy Statistics is the authoritative and official source of energy data for Australia, and forms the basis of Australia’s reporting obligations to the International Energy Agency.

Figure 2: Key uses of National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting data

Meet Australia's international reporting obligations

  • Australian National Greenhouse Accounts (national greenhouse gas inventory)
  • Australian Energy Statistics (authoritative handbook on energy resources)

Inform Commonwealth policy, programs and activities

Inform the Australian public

  • National Emissions Projections
  • Safeguard mechanism (linked to Emissions Reduction Fund)
  • Greenhouse and energy data required reporting
  • National Energy Productivity Plan
  • Energy, Water and Environment Survey
  • Energy Account Australia
  • Australian Energy Statistics
  • Carbon Dioxide Equivalent Intensity Index (Australian Energy Market Operator)
  • Policy and program formulation and analysis by Commonwealth agencies

Inform state and territory policy, programs and activities

  • Policy and program formulation and analysis by state and territory agencies
  • Avoid duplication of state and territory reporting requirements
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Forums for information sharing

We provide the secretariat for the Commonwealth Information Sharing Network and the State and Territory Information Sharing Network, which are forums to discuss National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting scheme data.

Attendees at the 2016 and 2017 meetings confirmed the network is strengthening relationships with data users from Commonwealth, state and territory jurisdictions.

The networks will continue to assist governments to identify opportunities for further use of National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting scheme data.

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Emissions and Energy Reporting System

Clients prepare and submit their reports using the Emissions and Energy Reporting System. We have designed this system to minimise the administrative burden for reporting, while maintaining the integrity of the data. We release a new version each year to align with new legislative requirements and improve its usability based on client feedback.

FEATURE ARTICLE

A closer look at emissions and energy data

To increase the value of the National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting scheme data we collect each year, we have increased the amount of data we publish, either on our website or to partner agencies.

During 2016–17 we published more data, graphs and information than we have in the past on a dedicated section of our website called A closer look at emissions and energy data.

This dedicated section of the website provides a different perspective on National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting scheme data, by aggregating the data to reveal points of interest and trends.

Aggregating the data ensures we maintain client confidentiality, while providing insights into the data for the Australian public, researchers and other government agencies.

This year we released new aggregated data for national scope 1 emissions by industry, the highest emitters of scope 1 emissions, and state and territory scope 1 emissions by industry.

We have also provided National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting scheme data to the CSIRO to trial including it in the Energy Use Data Model. The model will provide meaningful and accessible energy data through a central online platform–capturing measured consumption as well as key demographic and technological features of Australian consumers, while maintaining the confidentiality of sensitive information.

In addition, National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting scheme data has been incorporated into the Australian Bureau of Statistics Business Longitudinal Analysis Data Environment (BLADE). This database is a company level statistical asset that will enable researchers and analysts to explore relationships between energy, emissions and other business variables held in the database. The National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting scheme data is supplied with strict adherence to security and confidentiality protocols.

Image acknowledgment: Clean Energy Regulator. Adelaide Brighton Cement, South Australia, multiple scheme participant.

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Looking forward

We are planning to release additional data in 2017–18 to provide a more in depth look at net energy consumption by industry sector.

The National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting scheme will continue to support the safeguard mechanism by providing the data to check compliance with baselines.

A project with the CSIRO’s Data61 is also underway, with funding support from the Australian Renewable Energy Agency. The Data61 project will explore how National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting scheme data could potentially be incorporated into the Australian Renewable Energy Mapping Infrastructure Project in a way that retains confidentiality of reporter level data. The project is seeking to consolidate data relating to renewable energy resources, demand and infrastructure into a single, freely accessible online mapping portal16.

  1. See Glossary for definition of Controlling corporation.
  2. See Glossary for definition of Reporting transfer certificate holders.
  3. Percentages do not add to 100 per cent due to rounding.
  4. www.nationalmap.gov.au/renewables
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