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Performance results

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​Objective: Engaged, active and compliant clients

We want our clients to be informed, capable and willing to comply. To be effective, we need​ to attract and retain clients that meet the requirements of our voluntary schemes and can benefit from our schemes’ incentives. We also need to encourage compliance by assisting clients that have mandatory obligations under the schemes.

To assess our performance against this objective, we consider our performance of engagement, guidance and communications activities as well as our activities in relation to collecting information for registration and accreditation, using the following key performance indicators.

Level of client satisfaction with the engagement and guidance provided

Source: Corporate Plan 2017–2021

Results

64 per cent of clients surveyed agreed or strongly agreed that the Clean Energy Regulator effectively engages clients.

2017–18

2016–17

64%

76%

To assess our clients’ level of satisfaction with our engagement, guidance and communications activities, we seek feedback from them on an annual basis. This feedback is used to assess our performance and improve our approach to client engagement.

Our agency’s client survey is conducted on a biennial basis, with a shorter pulse survey conducted during alternate years. The results for 2017–18 are based on the pulse survey, which focuses on client perceptions of our agency, staff performance and our agency’s systems.

Feedback from the 2017–18 survey indicated that 64 per cent of respondents agree we effectively engage with our clients. Based on the verbatim comments received, the decrease from last year is likely due to known client service delivery issues in the Small-scale Renewable Energy Scheme with processing times for small-scale technology certificates and the need to accelerate improvements in client useability of our agency’s IT systems. We have developed a three-year roadmap that outlines the steps we are taking to improve or replace our systems (see Purchasing and procurement). We value the feedback provided by our clients and will continue to work with them to address their feedback and find solutions for areas of concern.

For more details regarding our client survey see Corporate governance.

Proportion of client contacts resolved at first interaction

Source: Corporate Plan 2017–2021

Results

79 per cent of client contacts via phone were resolved at first interaction.

2017–18

2016–17

79%

82%

We support our clients through a dedicated in-house Contact Centre. This performance measure is an indicator of our efficiency in handling client enquiries and the quality of our service to clients.

In 2017–18 our Contact Centre resolved 79 per cent of telephone enquiries, which was slightly lower than the 2016–17 result.

Due to the technical nature of the schemes we administer, we expect some enquiries will require escalation to business areas for resolution. The 21 per cent of phone calls that were not resolved at first contact were considered complex in nature and were referred to technical subject matter experts within our agency for guidance and resolution. We expect a slight decrease in the resolution rate at times when changes to our schemes are implemented.

Volume of Australian carbon credit units (ACCUs) issued

Source: Corporate Plan 2017–2021

Results

A total of 12,207,903 ACCUs were issued under the Emissions Reduction Fund.

2017–18

2016–17

12,207,903

13,151,991

One Australian carbon credit unit (ACCU) is issued for each tonne of carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2-e) stored or avoided by a project under the Emissions Reduction Fund. The number of ACCUs we issue indicates the level of carbon abatement that has been achieved by clients participating in the Emissions Reduction Fund. Clients submit crediting applications to claim ACCUs on the abatement delivered, based on project delivery schedules across the life of the project. Crediting applications also provide an indication of how Emissions Reduction Fund projects are progressing.

The volume of ACCUs issued in 2017–18 decreased by 7.2 per cent from 2016–17. This partly reflects variability in the timing of Emissions Reduction Fund projects generating ACCUs and reporting. We expect the number of ACCUs issued to grow in future years.

At 30 June 2018 there were 738 projects registered under the Emissions Reduction Fund, with 342 projects issued with ACCUs during the year. Of the ACCUs issued, 61 per cent relate to vegetation projects, 23 per cent to waste projects, 13 per cent to savanna burning and a small percentage to energy efficiency and agriculture projects.

For more details about ACCUs issued under the Emissions Reduction Fund see Emissions Reduction Fund.

Volume of renewable energy certificates validated

Source: Corporate Plan 2017–2021

Results

A total of 45,590,909 renewable energy certificates were validated through the Renewable Energy Target’s Small-scale Renewable Energy Scheme and Large-scale Renewable Energy Target.

2017–18

2016–17

45,590,909

37,995,469

The volume of renewable energy certificates validated is an indicator of the level of participation of clients in the Renewable Energy Target and the volume of electricity generated from renewable energy sources under the scheme.

One large-scale generation certificate represents one megawatt hour of additional electricity generated by an accredited renewable energy power station. One small-scale technology certificate equates to one megawatt hour of electricity generated or displaced (reduced demand from the electricity grid).

Large-scale Renewable Energy Target

A total of 20,023,012 large-scale generation certificates were validated in 2017–18 compared with 19,374,659 certificates validated in 2016–17. This was due to an increase in the number of renewable energy power stations accredited under the Large-scale Renewable Energy Target.

This reflects 20,023,012 megawatt hours of additional electricity generated by accredited renewable energy power stations, which is an increase of three per cent on the number of large-scale generation certificates validated in 2016–17.

For more details about the Large-scale Renewable Energy Target and large-scale generation certificates see Renewable Energy Target.

Small-scale Renewable Energy Scheme

A total of 25,567,897 small-scale technology certificates were validated in 2017–18, which is an increase of 37 per cent compared with 2016–17. This increase is due to both a higher number of renewable energy systems being installed and assessed as eligible under the Small-scale Renewable Energy Scheme and these systems being of a larger size.

Solar photovoltaic installations accounted for 92 per cent of the small-scale technology certificates validated, while solar water heaters and air source pumps accounted for seven per cent, and wind systems accounted for less than one per cent of total validated small-scale technology certificates.

For more details about the Small-scale Renewable Energy Scheme and small-scale technology certificates see Renewable Energy Target.

Proportion of applications processed within statutory or agreed timeframes

Source: Corporate Plan 2017–2021

Results

Across all schemes, we processed 98.4 per cent of applications within statutory or administrative timeframes. Where statutory timeframes do not exist, we apply internal administrative timeframes for application processing.

2017–18

2016–17

98.4%

99.1%

We consider the proportion of applications processed within statutory or administrative timeframes is an indicator of our agency’s efficiency, ensuring we meet our statutory and administrative timeframes. Across our schemes, we performed consistently against this performance measure, with a minor refinement to the reporting of the safeguard mechanism to include all types of applications.

Emissions Reduction Fund (auction qualification and registration)

This financial year we received 177 auction applications. Applications were assessed against established criteria, in some cases requiring us to seek additional information from project proponents and other bodies (for example, to check financial viability). Of the applications received, 100 per cent were processed prior to the relevant auction.

For more details about the Emissions Reduction Fund see Emissions Reduction Fund.

Emissions Reduction Fund (project registration, variation and crediting)

In total, we processed 898 project registration, variation and crediting applications during 2017–18. Of these, 874 were processed within the statutory timeframe of 90 days. In assessing applications we use a risk-based approach. This approach has resulted in reduced processing times for low risk crediting applications and enabled us to focus on higher risk applications. Some crediting applications for vegetation projects were subjected to detailed analysis where there were concerns about the stratification of the project area. This resulted in a delay in processing a small number of applications.

For more details about the Emissions Reduction Fund see Emissions Reduction Fund.

National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting scheme

We processed all of the 141 National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting applications within the administrative timeframe of 30 days. These applications related to a range of National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting applications (including to register or deregister entities under the legislation) and corporations were advised of outcomes within the required timeframes.

For more details about the National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting scheme see National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting scheme.

Safeguard mechanism

Of the 206 applications received, 94 per cent were processed within the statutory timeframe of 60 days. In total, 12 applications were not processed within the timeframe, as the assessment period occurred across our agency’s Christmas and New Year shutdown period. We engaged with affected responsible emitters in advance of the deadline and advised if further information was needed in support of their application.

For more details about the safeguard mechanism see Emissions Reduction Fund.

Large-scale Renewable Energy Target

We processed 100 per cent of applications for power station accreditation within the six week administrative timeframe. The volume of applications increased this year to 274 from 90 in 2016–17 representing an increase of 204 per cent. This substantial increase in the number of applications shows an increase in the uptake of large-scale power stations by commercial and industrial businesses. The administrative efficiencies implemented by our agency together with improved client guidance material has helped to achieve this processing performance.

For more details about the Large-scale Renewable Energy Target see Renewable Energy Target.

Renewable Energy Certificate Registry (REC Registry)

We processed 100 per cent of applications to participate in the Large-scale Renewable Energy Target and Small-Scale Renewable Energy Scheme, lodged through the Renewable Energy Certificate Registry (REC Registry), within the administrative timeframe of six weeks. During 2017–18, we received a total of 515 applications for registered person and registered agent accounts. This represents a two per cent increase in processing performance, despite the total number of applications processed increasing by nine per cent compared with 2016–17. This increased performance resulted from realising administrative efficiencies in business processes. The increased number of applications could be attributed to the continuing interest in the financial incentives available through the schemes for renewable energy system owners and for businesses seeking to participate as registered agents.

For more details about the Renewable Energy Certificate Registry (REC Registry) see Online registries and systems.

Australian National Registry of Emissions Units (ANREU)

We processed all but one of the 150 applications received within the statutory timeframe of 90 days. This represents an increase in processing performance of five per cent. The increased performance is due to realising administrative efficiencies through harmonising business processes and refining risk-based approaches.

For more details about Australian National Registry of Emissions Units see Online registries and systems.

Performance against our objective

Against our objective of engaged, active and compliant clients, we have maintained high results similar to our performance in previous years. In relation to our engagement and guidance activities, our clients were satisfied with our guidance material. While the percentage of client contacts resolved at first interaction was slightly down from last year, we expect this when there are changes to our schemes, such as the first compliance period for the safeguard mechanism. In relation to registration, accreditation and approvals, our performance was within our expectations and in line with our performance in previous years. This is particularly pleasing given the increased volume of applications our agency has processed in response to the growing number of clients taking up incentives under our schemes, and the changes we have implemented to create efficiencies in the processing of these applications.

Objective: Efficient and effective administration

As an agency operating for the public good we have an obligation to be efficient and effective. In response to the government’s regulatory reform agenda, we continuously look for ways of doing things more efficiently for us and our clients.

To measure our performance against this objective we consider our business operations, people services, investigations and enforcement, and report our performance against the following specific key performance indicators.

Proportion of successful civil penalty proceedings

Source: Corporate Plan 2017–2021

Results

No civil penalty proceedings were commenced/completed during 2017–18.

2017–18

2016–17

-

Not reported against

For 2017–18, no civil penalty proceedings were commenced or completed by our agency.

For more details about our investigations see Scheme compliance

Proportion of enforceable undertakings materially complied with

Source: Corporate Plan 2017–2021

Results

75 per cent (3 of 4) of enforceable undertakings, which were due for completion, were materially complied with.

2017–18

2016–17

75%

Not reported against

The Clean Energy Regulator may accept enforceable undertakings from scheme participants in cases of potential or actual non-compliance. Enforceable undertakings are written statements from a person or organisation that they will do, or refrain from doing, certain things to resolve breaches or improve compliance with the legislation.

In 2016–17, we reported on our clients’ completion of enforceable undertakings. In 2017–18, we further refined this performance measure to report on whether the enforceable undertakings have been materially complied with. If an enforceable undertaking is materially complied with,
our agency is satisfied that the client has met the key objectives of the enforceable undertaking.

In 2017–18, four enforceable undertakings were required to be completed. One enforceable undertaking was not fully complied with during the year. The matter is currently being reviewed, including the enforcement options available to our agency to ensure the undertaking is met.

For more details about our investigations see Scheme compliance.

Positive assessments under the Regulator Performance Framework

Source: Corporate Plan 2017–2021

Results

The self-assessment report of our agency’s performance under the Regulator Performance Framework was published in December 2017. We achieved positive ratings against each of the specific measures under the Regulator Performance Framework.

2017–18

2016–17

Positive

Positive

As a regulator, we work to ensure that we uphold the government’s principles for regulatory practice to foster good relationships with our clients. A positive assessment against the Regulator Performance Framework helps to confirm the effectiveness of our agency’s processes and practices. We use this self-assessment process as a means of assessing how we can continue to improve our regulatory performance and look for opportunities for continuous improvement.

For further details about our performance under the Regulator Performance Framework, the 2016–17 self-assessment report is published on our website.

Level of client satisfaction with staff interactions

Source: Corporate Plan 2017–2021

Results

71 per cent of clients surveyed were satisfied with their interactions with our staff.

2017–18

2016–17

71%

79%

We survey our clients as an indicator of client satisfaction with staff interactions and to assess the effectiveness of agency staff in supporting our clients. This helps us to evaluate service delivery and identify areas for future staff development.

Our agency’s client survey is conducted on a biennial basis, with a shorter pulse survey conducted during alternate years. The results for 2017–18 are based on the pulse survey. In 2017–18, 71 per cent of clients surveyed were satisfied or very satisfied with their interactions with our staff. Clients reported high ratings for staff demonstrating knowledge and understanding of legislation and processes. Clients also had high satisfaction ratings with staff being approachable.

This was a decrease from the 2016-17 result, which is attributed to a decline in overall satisfaction from clients due mainly to a step up in compliance and debt recovery by the agency. We will continue to work with these clients to resolve these issues.

For more details about our client survey see Corporate governance.

Proportion of briefs accepted by the Director of Public Prosecutions

Source: Corporate Plan 2017–2021

Results

100 per cent (1 of 1) of the briefs submitted to the Director of Public Prosecutions were accepted.

2017–18

2016–17

100%

Not reported against

This performance measure is used to assess the quality of briefs prepared by our agency for enforcement action referred to the Director of Public Prosecutions.

Our agency continues to pursue enforcement action against entities that do not comply with our schemes. During 2017–18, one brief was prepared for the Director of Public Prosecutions. The brief was accepted.

For more details about our investigations see Scheme compliance.

No significant breaches of government administrative, legal and policy requirements

Source: Corporate Plan 2017–2021

Results

There were four significant breaches of government, administrative, legal or policy requirements.

2017–18

2016–17

4

0

This performance measure reports on our agency’s compliance with governance and control frameworks ensuring that we operate within the Australian Government administrative, legal and policy boundaries.

A breach of privacy occurred in 2016. The matter was raised with our agency in 2018 and a determination was made that a breach had occurred. The breach was considered minor in impact and an apology was given to the affected person. A recommendation was also made that further training should be given to officers regarding our obligations under the Privacy Act 1988.

In addition, during 2017–18, there were three breaches of the Clean Energy Regulator Act 2011 related to the disclosure or secrecy provisions.

  • In two cases, documents were inadvertently sent to the incorrect person. In both cases, we confirmed that the information had been deleted by the recipient and affected parties were notified.
  • In one case, National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting production data obtained prior to the establishment of the Clean Energy Regulator on 2 April 2012, was disclosed to a government agency. The government agency was advised that it was no longer permitted to receive National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting data from pre 2 April 2012 due to the repeal of the Equal Employment Opportunity Act 2010.

Following the breaches, we provided training on disclosure and advice on non-compliance disclosure obligations to relevant staff to ensure such breaches do not occur again.

For more details about our compliance approach see Chapter 4: Management and accountability on page 13.

Proportion of clients paid within agreed payment terms

Source: Corporate Plan 2017–2021

Results

94 per cent of clients were paid within agreed payment terms.

2017–18

2016–17

94%

Not reported against

This performance measure reports on our agency’s performance in ensuring our clients and suppliers are paid on time and within payment terms.

During 2017–18, a small number of invoices were paid outside the payment terms. This can occur for a number of reasons, such as incorrect submission of a correctly rendered tax invoice for payment or temporary disruption of IT systems preventing the finalisation of payment.

As a non-corporate Commonwealth entity, we comply with payment terms that require payment no later than 30 days after the date of receipt from the supplier for contracts valued up to and including $1 million (GST inclusive). Where payments are not made within the payment terms, our agency is required to pay interest to the supplier where the amount is more than $100 (GST inclusive). In 2017–18, we paid a total of $3,017 (GST exclusive) in interest on late payments.

For more details see Chapter 5: Finances.

Performance against our objective

In measuring our performance against the objective of efficient and effective administration, this year we developed some new performance measures, in particular around our investigations and enforcement activities. Monitoring and reporting against our investigations and enforcement actions provides significant assurance on how effectively we are implementing our regulatory posture. Our ongoing commitment to efficient and effective administration is further demonstrated by continued positive results for our operational performance measures.

Objective: A trusted, relevant and expert institution

To address the challenge of reducing carbon emissions, the Clean Energy Regulator will need to operate for many years as a capable, trusted agency relied upon to make sound decisions based on excellent knowledge and data.

To measure our performance against this objective, we consider activities related to monitoring and encouraging compliance and providing market services functions. We report our performance against the following specific key performance indicators.

Proportion of contracted abatement delivered

Source: Corporate Plan 2017–2021
Portfolio Budget Statement 2017–18

Results

91 per cent of carbon abatement contracted under the Emissions Reduction Fund was delivered as originally scheduled.

2017–18

2016–17

91%

101%

The proportion of carbon abatement delivered against the original schedule of projects is an indicator of the effectiveness of our agency’s administration of the Emissions Reduction Fund’s contract management function.

During 2017–18, 10,923,950 Australian carbon credit units (ACCUs) were delivered compared to the original delivery schedule of 12,029,112 ACCUs (91 per cent).

The result can fluctuate year-on-year due to the design of the carbon abatement contract, where sellers are able to bring forward deliveries and can negotiate in good faith to defer up to 20 per cent of deliveries against contract milestones, provided that the total contracted volume is delivered by the end of the contract. We monitor the performance of contracts and seek additional information from sellers where appropriate.

A total of 32,812,419 ACCUs have been delivered under the Emissions Reduction Fund to 30 June 2018.

For more details on the Emissions Reduction Fund see Emissions Reduction Fund.

Proportion of safeguard facilities without an excess emissions situation after the previous financial year

Source: Corporate Plan 2017–2021

Results

100 per cent of responsible emitters complied with their obligations for the 2016–17 reporting year.

2017–18

2016–17

100%

Not applicable

The proportion of safeguard facilities without an excess emissions situation is an indicator that entities have complied with their obligations under the National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting (Safeguard Mechanism) Rule 2015. A responsible emitter is defined as a person who is required to keep the facility’s net emissions at or below its emissions baseline.

2017–18 was the first reporting year for the safeguard mechanism. We actively engaged with responsible emitters to build understanding of the new legislation and their obligations. Early on, responsible emitters were involved in the co-design of technical guidance and throughout the first safeguard year were engaged on emissions management options relevant to their individual circumstances. This approach assisted all responsible emitters to comply with their obligations.

For more details on the safeguard mechanism see Emissions Reduction Fund.

Proportion of scheme-based statutory decisions upheld upon external or internal reviews

Source: Corporate Plan 2017–2021

Results

60 per cent (3 of 5) of internal review decisions were upheld. 100 per cent (1 of 1) of external review decisions were upheld.

2017–18

2016–17

Internal review decisions: 60%

External review decisions: 100%

Not reported against

This performance measure reports on the outcome of reviews of decisions made by our agency. These reviews arise where clients believe that their interests have been adversely affected by a Clean Energy Regulator decision. A review of the decision may uphold or make a different decision. This performance measure reports on the number of decisions upheld upon internal or external review.

In 2017–18, two decisions were made in relation to applications for review lodged during 2016–17. These two review decisions confirmed our agency’s original decisions but were later referred for external review. The reviews are still before the Federal Court and the Administrative Appeals Tribunal (AAT).

Also in 2017–18, an additional five applications for internal reviews were requested by clients. Of these, three have been determined (one confirmed and two varied). One application was rejected on the basis that it was not a valid application for review. One decision was outstanding as at 30 June 2018. One of the varied decisions was taken by the client to external review by the Office of the Australian Information Commissioner (OAIC). The OAIC declined to undertake a review of the matter.

We consider that our internal review mechanisms are sound. None of the decisions reviewed during 2017–18 indicated a fundamental flaw in the practices or procedures of our agency or disclosed a serious, unknown flaw in the legislation.

We currently have three matters under consideration by the Federal Court and the AAT in relation to the Emissions Reduction Fund.

For more details about external scrutiny see External scrutiny.

Compliance levels by regulated and liable entities

Source: Corporate Plan 2017–2021
Portfolio Budget Statement 2017–18

Results

99.7 per cent of regulated and liable entities were compliant.

2017–18

2016–17

99.7%

99.6%

The level of compliance by regulated and liable entities with statutory obligations is an indicator of our performance related to our agency’s engagement, education and guidance approach and materials.

Emissions Reduction Fund contract delivery

In 2017–18, all Emissions Reduction Fund contractors were compliant. We proactively monitored and managed contract milestones, in some cases six months ahead of time. Early engagement with sellers and agents often resulted in additional information provided, which confirmed whether the contract was performing as expected or if there were issues.

For more details about the Emissions Reduction Fund see Emissions Reduction Fund.

National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting scheme

In 2017–18, 16 regulated entities were non-compliant. We followed up with reporters that did not report by the 31 October 2017 deadline. Depending on the responses received, we took a number of actions ranging from show cause letters to referrals to our investigations team. Four entities were referred to our investigations team to take action in response to the non-compliance.

For more details about the National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting scheme see National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting scheme.

Safeguard mechanism

In 2017–18, the first year of operations under the safeguard mechanism, all regulated entities complied with their obligations. Sixteen responsible emitters surrendered a total of 448,097 Australian carbon credit units before 1 March 2018 to ensure they were at or below their baselines.

For more details about the safeguard mechanism see Emissions Reduction Fund.

Renewable Energy Target

In 2017–18, two regulated entities were non-compliant. We contacted these liable entities before and immediately after the 14 February 2018 deadline. Our agency subsequently made default assessments using Australian Energy Market Operator data.

For more details about the Renewable Energy Target see Renewable Energy Target.

Level of client satisfaction with the National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting scheme data available on the Information Portal

Source: Corporate Plan 2017–2021

Results

79 per cent of clients surveyed agreed that the National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting data is a trusted source.

2017–18

2016–17

79%

Not reported against

This performance measure is used to assess our client’s satisfaction with National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting scheme data and the processes by which data is made available.

Feedback is collected through a data users’ survey. In 2017–18, 79 per cent of clients agreed that National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting scheme data was a trusted source. We continue to work to improve the presentation of National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting scheme data and access so users can more easily interrogate the data set. New systems functionality is planned for 2018–19 to support improved access to the National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting scheme data in response to user feedback.

For more details on National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting scheme data see National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting scheme.

Compliance levels of auditors with the Clean Energy Regulator Audit Framework

Source: Corporate Plan 2017–2021

Results

Of the review activities conducted on auditors, 83 per cent were considered compliant with the Clean Energy Regulator Audit Framework.

2017–18

2016–17

83%

Not reported against

This performance measure is used to assess the performance of auditors who undertake independent assurance on the schemes our agency administers. The assessment of auditor performance and their compliance with our agency’s Audit Framework ensures the standards of independent assurance provided.

A total of 136 engagement activities were conducted during 2017–18 including reviews, annual reports and inspections. The results of these activities indicated:

  • 113 were compliant
  • five resulted in deregistration, suspension or imposition of conditions on ongoing registration, as a result of performance issues, and
  • as a result of auditor inactivity, 18 resulted in deregistration, suspension or imposition of conditions.

Auditor performance monitoring continues to detect occasional non-compliance. This is predominantly due to auditors not maintaining requirements to remain registered. All five cases of compliance action related to performance issues involved auditors either not undertaking sufficient audits under the Clean Energy Regulator’s Audit Framework or undertaking insufficient professional development to maintain their registration.

For more details on our Audit Framework see Scheme compliance.

Level of client satisfaction with registries and reporting systems

Source: Corporate Plan 2017–2021

Results

75 per cent of clients surveyed were satisfied with our registries and reporting systems.

2017–18

2016–17

75%

78%

This performance measure is an indicator of our agency’s ability to meet client expectations through the useability of online registries and reporting systems.

Our agency’s client survey is conducted on a biennial basis, with a shorter pulse survey conducted during alternate years. The results for 2017–18 are based on the pulse survey.

Our 2017 client survey found 75 per cent of clients surveyed were satisfied or very satisfied with our agency’s registries and reporting systems, which is broadly consistent with the 2016 client survey results. We will continue to use feedback from our client surveys to improve client usability of our systems.

For more details on the operation of our online registries and systems see Online registries and systems.

Performance against our objective

We continue to mature our performance against our objective of a trusted, relevant and expert institution. With respect to monitoring and encouraging compliance, our performance measures indicate continued high performance. Compliance levels by regulated and liable entities remained high and we achieved 100 per cent compliance by responsible emitters for the first year of the safeguard mechanism. In addition, the delivery of contracted carbon abatement remained high, exceeding the 80 per cent target as published in our Portfolio Budget Statement. As a strong indication of our standing as a trusted, relevant and expert institution, our clients continue to recognise the performance of our market services functions, through their positive feedback on the useability of our online registries and reporting systems.

Objective: Secure and enduring regulatory infrastructure

Our changing policy environment and client base, and the need to operate efficiently, mean we need resilient and adaptable long-term processes and systems as well as reliable data.

To measure our performance against this objective, we consider activities related to the provision of information and communications technology (ICT) services, and report our performance against the following specific key performance indicators.

Availability of online systems

Source: Corporate Plan 2017–2021

Results

Our online systems had an average availability of 99.5 per cent, including scheduled downtimes.

2017–18

2016–17

99.5%

98.7%

The availability of our online systems and registries is an indicator of our agency’s ability to create and foster client confidence in the market through the reliable operations of these services.

We currently administer three online systems for use by our clients and stakeholders, including our website, the Emissions and Energy Reporting System (EERS) and the Client Portal. In addition we operate two registries—the Australian National Registry of Emission Units (ANREU) and the Renewable Energy Certificate Registry (REC Registry).

We maintain our agency’s underpinning networks and systems as highly resilient and reliable infrastructure. Our agency’s underpinning networks and systems are maintained at a high level of resilience. Our agency has achieved high system performance through sound management of our service provider, systems and networks.

For more details on our agency’s online systems and registries see Online registries and systems.

Online systems are compliant with Australian Government standards

Source: Corporate Plan 2017–2021

Results

All online systems we administer complied with Australian Government standards.

2017–18

2016–17

Yes

Yes

Our compliance with Australian Government Standards is an indicator of our agency’s ability to deliver quality ICT systems to our clients and maintain compliance with the government’s requirements. We continuously monitor strategic, operational and scheme-based risks and assesses our agency’s risk tolerance levels to ensure that we do not become complacent in managing our online systems and databases.

Our agency is aware of the evolving nature of the operating environment and increasing sophistication of cyber-threat actors. In 2017–18, our agency’s Security Management Committee commissioned an independent Information Security Registered Assessors Program assessment of our systems to identify any potential areas for improvement given increasing threats and a disposition to lower our risk tolerance in view of these heightened threats. This report will be delivered early in 2018–19 and will assist our agency to identify and implement appropriate strategies to ensure our online systems operate within our prescribed risk tolerance.

For more details on our agency’s online systems and registries see Online registries and systems.

Performance against our objective

Our achievements against our objective of securing and enduring regulatory infrastructure demonstrate our strong ability in delivering reliable and resilient business systems and processes. As the custodian of key emissions, energy and abatement data, we are relied on to provide secure and robust online systems and registries. Our continued strong performance against this performance measure demonstrates our commitment to maintaining resilient infrastructure that is reliable and efficient for us and our users now and into the future.

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